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One of my homemade baking soda lasers in action. I used a reaction between baking soda and vinegar to produce the CO2 gas necessary for lasing. The invisible laser beam is focused onto the surface of an ordinary rock. The resulting power density causes the rock to melt and burn. When I move the rock, the effects of the laser beam become increasingly dramatic. Occasional sparks are produced as the rock is moved through the beam path.




- Contact me by email -

Decrypt by using actual numbers, a symbol for "at", and no spaces

(All small case letters):

jarrod six nine four at g mail dot com





About This Site:

Because skill level varies from one individual to the next, as do resources in terms of time and money; my examples of laser construction should be viewed as guidelines only. Much of what I build is done using common hardware, and is based upon accumulated skill and knowledge from proceeding projects.

The construction or use/operation of any laser device can be hazardous. Laser beams can cause permanent blindness, and the electrical power supplies can be deadly. I disclaim any liability associated with any information contained within this site, from any of the sites to which this site links, or from any form of references contained within this site.


 

Special Acknowledgement

Goldwasser, Sam: The author, organizer, and producer of what is unquestionably the world's largest volume of practical laser documentation.

Little, Douglas:

Nowak, Ricky:

Singer, Jon: Researcher formerly with Joss Research Institute

Wilson, Lindsay, PhD: For his indispensable assistance and seemingly inexhaustible knowledge, regarding, yet in no way limited to the following: